Open own yoga studio

Ever dream about opening your own yoga studio, but doubted it could actually happen? Trust us – you can do it. Here’s the proof.

 

Mind Body Green recently interviewed the founder of Y7 Yoga Studios – Sarah Levey – about her experiences running a studio. In case you’re not familiar, Y7 is an extremely popular studio with four locations in Manhattan, one in Brooklyn, and one in L.A. And while you might be quick to assume Ms. Levey is one of those rare beings who was gifted the ability to run her own successful studio, think again.

 

She’s not so different from the rest of us.

 

Before she opened her first studio, Levey was working as an accountant in the fashion industry while looking to start her yoga practice. Yet she struggled to find the right studio to met her needs. “I didn’t want to be forced into a certain mindset of a teacher or into poses that weren’t right for my body,” she told MBG.

 

That passion for finding the “right” studio turned into a revelation – maybe she had to make her own studio. And, with hard work and dedication she did. But here’s the thing – it wasn’t until she had opened up her third studio that she stopped working full-time at her other career. She realized she had something here and, if she wanted it to succeed, she needed to commit to it full time.

 

One of the biggest tips she has for folks in the same boat as she is to understand what you want your branding to convey. For her, she opted to use Squarespace to build her site (we use WordPress here at Yogasana).

 

Squarespace is so much more than a hosting platform. We are able to customize everything. Our brand image and feel is so important to us, and being able to have a place where we can bring what we think to life has been amazing,” she said.

 

Still, you might be wondering, how did Levey find such tremendous success? In reality, it comes down to her unique selling proposition. She wanted every single person coming into the studio to feel like they were entering an inclusive environment. She didn’t want new yogis walking into the studio to a ton of Sanskrit or symbols that they didn’t understand—she didn’t want them feeling like they felt like they were already on the outside the moment they walked in.

 

“Yoga is for everyone. Every type of body, every type of person. We aim to provide a safe space where anyone walking in feels comfortable to be themselves and take what they need out of the experience.”

 


 

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